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Great Britain

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 13 Collections and/or Records:

Adolf Leschnitzer Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25320 / MF 897
Abstract The Adolf Leschnitzer Collection documents the life and professional activities of Adolf Leschnitzer, researcher, historian, and teacher. The collection includes brochures, booklets, clippings, correspondence, financial, vital, and immigration documents, minutes, notes, photographs, printed materials, and writings, by Adolf Leschnitzer as well as other authors. Additionally, there are materials dealing with other members of the Leschnitzer family, namely his wife, Maria Leschnitzer, née Bratz, her mother, Elly Bratz, née Michael, Adolf and Maria Leschnitzers' son, Michael Lesch, also known as Michael Leschnitzer, and Adolf and Albertt Frank.
Dates: 1886-1986; Majority of material found in 1937-1973

Bernhard Felsenthal papers

 Collection
Identifier: P-21
Abstract This Collection consists primarily of English, German, Hebrew, and French language correspondence concerning Reform Judaism, Zionism; the founding of the American Jewish Historical Society; the Jewish Publication Society; B'nai B'rith; the legal position of Jews in England and the United States with particular reference to the Naturalization Acts; the religious and social life and the history of Jews in Russia and Poland; Bible readings in public schools; the study of Jesus in Jewish Sabbath Schools; anti-slavery issues in the Fremont Campaign in 1856; and other correspondence pertaining to his numerous activities.
Dates: undated, 1844-1922

Emigration Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 1989 / MF 894 / MM 129
Abstract Emigration 1864-1952: This collection - encompassing about 90 years - contains papers about the situation and persecution of Jews in Eastern European countries (Russia, Poland, Roumania, Bulgaria, Lithuania). Papers describe the activities of various relief organizations. There are more than 170 papers (ca.900 pages), about half of them written in German, about 30 each in French or English, over 20 in Yiddish and some in Polish. A printed appeal of the Reichsausschuss fuer Russisch-Juedische Fluechtlingshilfe, Berlin (1929) carries among others the signatures of Leo Baeck and ALbert Einstein. (VI, 16).
Dates: 1864-1995

Eugen and Frida Rosenberg Family Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 6434
Abstract This collection documents the family of Eugen Rosenberg and Frida Giglio Saenger Rosenberg née Magnus, in particular two of their sons, actor Hans-Karl Rosenberg (stage name Hans-Karl Magnus) and electrician Herbert Rosenberg. It includes a large amount of correspondence between Frida, Hans-Karl, and Herbert Rosenberg during World War Two.
Dates: 1867-1965; Majority of material found within 1898-1949

[Haifa Symposium]

 Collection
Identifier: MS 120
Abstract These are papers presented at a symposium, sponsored by the Leo Baeck Institute, held in Haifa, Israel, on March 13-15, 1983. Manuscripts from three additional presentations were not submitted for this collection.
Dates: Publication: 1983

Irene E. Barbasch Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25592
Abstract This collection contains the correspondence of Dr. Irene E. Barbasch written mainly in England during and just after WWII, as well as photographs and other documents pertaining to her relationship with Dr. Lilian P. Singer of Brno (Czech Republic).
Dates: 1883-2006; Majority of material found within 1940-1973

Judah P. Benjamin Collection

 Collection
Identifier: P-45
Abstract Judah P. Benjamin, called the "brains of the Confederacy", was a statesman and jurist in the United States, the Confederate States, and Great Britain. Benjamin achieved high-ranking titles wherever he served, and left an indelible mark in the South where he held more official positions than any other man during the Civil War. After the fall of the Confederacy, Benjamin fled to England, where he was admitted to the English bar, and later assumed a judgeship. In 1872, he was appointed the highest ranking of Queen's counselor.

This collection contains correspondence; letters; newspaper clippings; Confederate bank notes and bonds; Civil War memorabilia; pamphlets; and a bound copy of Benjamin's diary, kept from 1862-1864. These materials are of particular interest to researchers studying the activities and experiences of Jews in the antebellum South and under the brief reign of the Confederate States of America. Additionally, through the material relating to memorials and preservation endeavors for Benjamin, the collection also provides a look at the continued glorification of Confederate heroes in the South long into the twentieth century. The collection also contains pre-Civil War correspondence between Benjamin and Peter A. Hargous regarding the creation of a railroad line on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Mexico and the Tehuantepec Railroad Company of New Orleans.
Dates: undated, 1838, 1854-1884, 1893, 1925, 1930, 1942, 1948; Majority of material found within 1854-1884

Klein-Cohn Family Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 6217
Abstract The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence from Fanni Blatny, née Klein in England to her niece Alice Jaffé, née Rice in Maryland. Also included are correspondence and immigration documents pertaining to the extended Klein family. There are explanatory notes by Alice Jaffé throughout the collection.
Dates: 1938-1950, 1990; Majority of material found within 1945-1949

Ludwig Bendix Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 3380 / MF 595
Abstract Articles
Dates: 1912-1965

Martin Freilich Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25029 / MF 899
Abstract A short caption of M. Freilich’s life until the end of World War II. Personal documents (travel pass, id card), photos, newspaper clippings.
Dates: 1939-1946

Records of the Jewish Immigrant Information Bureau (Galveston, Tex.) Galveston Immigration Plan

 Collection
Identifier: I-90
Abstract The Galveston immigration records document the attempt of the Jewish Immigrant Information Bureau, working in cooperation with several other Jewish organizations, to receive Jewish immgrants through the port of Galveston, Texas rather than New York City. The papers further describe the JIIB's efforts to resettle the immigrants in communities throughout the United States. Papers include ship passenger lists, correspondence, and statistical reports, as well as papers dealing with individual immigration cases.
Dates: undated, 1901-1920

Ulrich Boschwitz Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25553
Abstract This collection contains writings by novelist Ulrich Alexander Boschwitz (1915–1942) as well as a few personal materials and documents about his estate and legacy.
Dates: circa 1930-2007

Walter Breslauer Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 4129
Abstract Published articles by the lawyer and Jewish community leader Walter Breslauer on matters of interest for German Jewish refugees after World War Two, including legal matters; international law; questions concerning restitution for German refugees; articles about Jewish personalities; and articles about the Jewish community in Berlin.
Dates: 1928-1981