Skip to main content

Deeds

 Subject
Subject Source: Art & Architecture Thesaurus

Found in 7 Collections and/or Records:

Gratz family (Philadelphia) papers

 Collection
Identifier: P-8
Abstract This collection contains correspondence, legal documents, and miscellaneous items concerning the personal lives and business interests of brothers Barnard (1738-1801) and Michael Gratz (1740-1811). It also contains the correspondence of Rebecca Gratz (1781-1869), Michael Gratz's daughter.
Dates: undated, 1753-1916

Isaac de la Motta Collection

 Collection
Identifier: P-493
Abstract Contains certified copies of various documents presented to the court and pertaining to the estate of Isaac de la Motta of Charleston, South Carolina. Included is a copy of a deed of sale for slaves owned by Sarah Canter de la Motta and witnessed by John Canter, and a copy of the ketubah, in Hebrew and also in translation, of Isaac de la Motta and Sarah Canter, signed by Levi Sheftall, Abraham De Lyon, Isaac Franks, Raphael Da Costa Amesquita, and Isaac de la Motta, with accompanying affadavits. It is unclear for what purpose these documents were prepared.
Dates: 1796-1832

Phillip Jacobs collection

 Collection
Identifier: P-10
Abstract Contains correspondence, receipt books, business records, insurance policies, the will of Henry Whiteman, Jacobs' father-in-law, records pertaining to the settlement of Whiteman's estate, Jacobs' will, and material relating to the settlement of Jacobs' estate by Peter McCartee, Richard Cunningham, and Richard Ellis.
Dates: undated, 1760-1832

Records of Temple Beth El (Helena, Arkansas)

 Collection
Identifier: I-470
Abstract The records of Temple Beth El offer a valuable insight into a small town Southern Jewish community. The community members, composed mainly of German Jews devoted to the Reform movement, participated actively in charity work and mutual benefit societies, and maintained a close relationship with Jewish communities throughout the South. Temple Beth El was one of the first members of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. Its history reflects the struggles a small town Jewish community experienced in maintaining their Jewish identity as well as the cooperation and acceptance of their non-Jewish neighbors. A significant part of the collection concerns the activities of women in the Helena Jewish community, who were a tight knit group that conducted extensive charity work. The Sisterhood took an active role as member of the Mississippi-Arkansas Federation of Temple Sisterhoods. The records also include minute books for the B'nai B'rith Esther Lodge. The collection contains correspondence, real estate deeds, financial ledgers, minute meetings, news clippings, a scrapbook, and photographs.
Dates: undated, 1875-2006

Records of the Baron de Hirsch Fund

 Collection
Identifier: I-80
Abstract The Baron de Hirsch Fund Records document the organization's involvement in the planning of agricultural communities across the United States and to some extent in South America; the founding and administrative dealings of agricultural and trade schools; the establishment of the Jewish Agricultural Society; and the business records of the Fund itself. In addition, the collection documents the protection offered to immigrants through port work, relief, temporary aid, promotion of suburban industrial enterprises and removal from urban centers through the Industrial Removal Office, land settlement, agricultural training, and trade and general education. In this respect, the collection is of major interest for Jewish genealogists as it documents a number of individual immigrants. In addition, the collection contains documentation on the administration and organization of the fund, documentation on Jewish farming colonies such as the Jewish Agricultural Society, Woodbine Colony and Agricultural School, and documentation on the Baron de Hirsch Trade School. In addition, the collection contains blueprints and photographs of facilities.
Dates: undated, 1819-1991; Majority of material found within 1882 - 1935

Records of the Ostrowo Jewish Community Council

 Collection
Identifier: RG 13
Abstract The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish community of Ostrów Wielkopolski, today in west-central Poland, in the Greater Poland Voivodeship. The region was annexed by Prussia in 1793, in the Second Partition of Poland; in German the town was known as Ostrowo. The records date mainly from 1834 to 1919, with a few materials from as early as 1822. During this period the town was part of the Posen (Poznań) region of Prussia and, after 1871, of the German Empire; in 1919, it was incorporated into the Second Republic of Poland. The community numbered nearly 2,000 members in the late 19th century and declined steadily thereafter due to migration of members to larger German cities or overseas; only a small Jewish community remained during the interwar period. The records are mainly those of the Jewish communal administration, or council; a small amount of material pertains to several community voluntary organizations. Included are financial records such as budgets, balance sheets, and tax lists; communal minutes and decisions throughout the period; correspondence with the government, and, to a lesser extent, with Jewish organizations and other Jewish communities; records pertaining to community members' naturalizations, marriages, births, and synagogue seat contracts; petitions from individual community members, especially pertaining to charitable aid in the mid to late 19th century; records pertaining to communal educational and religious institutions; records on the hiring and employment of community rabbis,cantors, and other personnel, including application materials from candidates not hired; property records and mortgages; documentation of construction and renovation of communal buildings; records related to court cases, bequests, and estate and guardianship matters; and ephemera such as meeting notices and announcement fliers, as well as scattered clippings.
Dates: 1822-1919

Uriah P. Levy Collection

 Collection
Identifier: P-43
Abstract Uriah Phillips Levy rose to the rank of Commodore in the United States Navy despite religious hostility. He succeeded in abolishing corporal punishment in the Navy, and is credited for preserving Thomas Jefferson's estate, Monticello. His papers consist of correspondence, financial and legal records, publications, papers, newspaper articles, a notebook, and a book.
Dates: undated, 1787-1948, 1959, 1961, 1985, 2005