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Ostrów Wielkopolski (Poland)

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 4 Collections and/or Records:

Edward Luft Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 6957
Abstract Various articles, excerpts, maps, and books related to the Jewish community in Posen/Poznan, collected by Edward Luft.
Dates: 1698-2009

Frost and Wegner Family Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 6468
Abstract This collection holds the documents of Ismar Frost, his wife Rose Frost (née Wegner) and their family. The collection consists of private correspondence, professional and official correspondence, a large amount of restitution documents, personal documents and family photographs. It also holds Ismar Frost’s and other’s writings – fiction and non-fiction.
Dates: 1871-2003; Majority of material found within 1903-1969

Jacob Jacobson Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 7002 / MF 447 / MF 134
Abstract Records of several Jewish communities assembled by Jacob Jacobson.
Dates: 1450-1988

Records of the Ostrowo Jewish Community Council

 Collection
Identifier: RG 13
Abstract The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish community of Ostrów Wielkopolski, today in west-central Poland, in the Greater Poland Voivodeship. The region was annexed by Prussia in 1793, in the Second Partition of Poland; in German the town was known as Ostrowo. The records date mainly from 1834 to 1919, with a few materials from as early as 1822. During this period the town was part of the Posen (Poznań) region of Prussia and, after 1871, of the German Empire; in 1919, it was incorporated into the Second Republic of Poland. The community numbered nearly 2,000 members in the late 19th century and declined steadily thereafter due to migration of members to larger German cities or overseas; only a small Jewish community remained during the interwar period. The records are mainly those of the Jewish communal administration, or council; a small amount of material pertains to several community voluntary organizations. Included are financial records such as budgets, balance sheets, and tax lists; communal minutes and decisions throughout the period; correspondence with the government, and, to a lesser extent, with Jewish organizations and other Jewish communities; records pertaining to community members' naturalizations, marriages, births, and synagogue seat contracts; petitions from individual community members, especially pertaining to charitable aid in the mid to late 19th century; records pertaining to communal educational and religious institutions; records on the hiring and employment of community rabbis,cantors, and other personnel, including application materials from candidates not hired; property records and mortgages; documentation of construction and renovation of communal buildings; records related to court cases, bequests, and estate and guardianship matters; and ephemera such as meeting notices and announcement fliers, as well as scattered clippings.
Dates: 1822-1919