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Jews -- Charities

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 23 Collections and/or Records:

Adelebsen Jewish Community Records

 Collection
Identifier: RG 244
Abstract The collection contains records of the Jewish community of Adelebsen, Germany, spanning the years 1832 to 1917. During this period Adelebsen, a small town in the vicinity of Göttingen, was at first located in the kingdom of Hanover. When the latter was annexed by the kingdom of Prussia in 1866 it became known as the province of Hanover; and in 1871 it became part of the German Empire. A small amount of material pertains to the Jewish community in Barterode, some members of which eventually joined the Adelebsen community. Approximately half of the collection comprises financial records covering the period from 1838 to 1917 (with gaps), including annual statements; account books; lists of taxes, donations, synagogue fines, and synagogue seat fees collected from members; lists of families with school-age children; and accounts of the Adelebsen Jewish charitable association. The remainder of the records comprise administrative correspondence and documents, with correspondents including the government offices in Adelebsen, Uslar, and Hildesheim; the rabbis who headed regional districts of Jewish communities ('Landrabbiner'); and community members, including Sally Blumenfeld, the long-time teacher heading the Jewish school. Noteworthy documents include a handwritten copy of the Hanoverian synagogue regulations issued by Rabbi Nathan Marcus Adler in 1832, with later amendments; minutes of two meetings with Adler, one in 1836 at which he initiated the project to build a new synagogue; a regulation of 1841 governing the community's tax assessment; minutes of oath-taking by community officers and assessors in the Adelebsen municipal court; election materials; and files related to matters such as employment of the Jewish teacher, petition for exemption from the municipal poor tax, preparations for matzah baking, and purchase of a garden plot to expand the Jewish cemetery.
Dates: circa 1775, 1830-1917; Majority of material found within 1832-1917

Comité national de Secours aux refugies allemands victimes de l'anti-semitisme (Paris)

 Collection
Identifier: RG 334
Abstract This collection holds records pertaining to the Comité national de Secours aux refugies allemands victimes de l'anti-semitisme and documents the work of the organization. Included in this collection is correspondence, statistical reports, lists, announcements, and material on the founding of the organization.
Dates: 1933 - 1934

Diary of Berta Hellmann

 Collection
Identifier: AR 53
Abstract Diary kept by Berta Hellmann during World War I. The diary discusses Hellmann's work with the Bahnhofpflege Ulm during the war, as well as important events during the war and its immediate aftermath. Included are clippings, photographs, letters, postcards, and circulars. The diary is accompanied by a biographical sketch.
Dates: 1914-1919

Eliyahu Guttmacher Papers

 Collection
Identifier: RG 27
Abstract Eliyahu Guttmacher was a rabbi, Talmudic scholar, mystic, communal leader, and early Zionist. During his lifetime he was known as the Tsadik of Grätz and thousands of Jews flocked to him for blessings and advice. Guttmacher was also known for his support of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Kalischer, an early Zionist, and for his extensive collection of funds for institutions in Palestine. The bulk of the collection consists of several thousand kvitlekh (written requests to a rabbi asking for a blessing or advice). The kvitlekh were received from Jews residing in Poland and other, mostly European, countries. They reflect the social history of European Jews in the mid-19th century and relate to financial, medical, and family problems. In addition, the collection contains the following: general correspondence, including inquiries relating to religious matters, family correspondence, legal documents such as court and government papers, bills, certifications by unidentified authors, discussions on Jewish law by unknown authors, amulets, business documents, and receipts for contributions to charitable institutions in Palestine.
Dates: 1828-1908, 1958; Majority of material found within 1847-1874

Frankfurt am Main Jewish Community Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 279
Abstract This collection contains a wide range of materials, ranging from personal correspondence to programs and mass mailings, which for the most part have to do with various community institutions and membership organizations of the pre-war Frankfurt community.
Dates: 1614-2005

Freedom Benevolent Society Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 11099
Abstract The Freedom Benevolent Society was a mutual aid and fraternal organization founded by Jewish immigrants from the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1882, on the Lower East Side of New York City. Originally known as the Erster Kaiser Franz Josef Kranken Unterstützungs–Verein, or the First Franz Joseph Sick and Benevolent Society, it was incorporated in 1883. Its main purpose was to provide its members with sick benefits, and relief in times of need, as well as fellowship and entertainment. Eventually it also functioned as a burial society, and maintained cemetery plots. The collection documents the society's activities over more than a century, from 1884 until its initiation of dissolution proceedings, in 1991. It includes membership applications from the early decades of the society's history (1884-1927), anniversary programs spanning fifty years (1932-1982), and a visitors' register for the 1500th meeting, in 1950, as well as account books, meeting notices, and two cemetery plans, one of which relates to the Franz Joseph Ladies Sick and Benevolent Society.
Dates: 1884-1991

Fritz Leopold Steinthal Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 954
Abstract The collection contains handwritten letters by a variety of prominent rabbis and Jewish thinkers, including Jacob Bernays, Philipp Bloch, Zacharias Frankel, Abraham Geiger, Heinrich Graetz, Ludwig Philippson, and Gabriel Riesser, all regarding applications and recommendations for positions at the Jewish teacher training school of the Marks-Haindorf-Stiftung in Münster. Two brief letters by Alexander Haindorf, the founder of the Marks-Haindorf-Stiftung, are administrative in nature. Also included is a passport issued to Hermann Steinthal by King Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia.
Dates: 1800-1868

Training Bureau for Jewish Communal Service (New York, N.Y.) Records

 Collection
Identifier: I-8
Abstract The Training Bureau for Jewish Communal Service trained professional social workers and students for positions in Jewish welfare agencies, 1947-1951. The collection includes correspondence, reports, minutes, and publicity files. It also includes materials on the course, including: curricula, syllabi, lecture outlines, student records (some restricted), and evaluation materials.
Dates: undated, 1941-1956, 1961

Hamburg Jewish Community Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 193 / MF 346
Abstract This collection contains correspondence and a large number of programs and announcements regarding the Jewish community in Hamburg, mostly during the 1930s.
Dates: 1931-1995

Landsmanshaftn Collection

 Collection
Identifier: I-332
Abstract The bulk of this collection consists of anniversary or souvenir journals for approximately ninety landsmanshaftn benevolent organizations.
Dates: undated, 1899-1971, 1991

Leopold Rosenak Collection

 Collection
Identifier: LBIJER 468
Abstract Series I of the collection pertains to Rabbi Leopold Rosenak's work as a field chaplain during World War I in Kaunas (Kowno) in Lithuania. It contains manuscripts by Rosenak including a report on his work as field chaplain in 1915, private and official correspondence (letters, cables) with individuals and institutions such as "Ausschuss fuer fahrbare Kriegsbuechereien an der Front", Leo Baeck, "Hilfsverein der deutschen Juden", "Kriegsministerium" (Prussian War Office), "Kaiserlich Tuerkisches Generalkonsulat zu Bremen" (Turkish Consulate in Bremen), and Erich Ludendorff. The correspondence documents in particular his activities for the native Jewish population in Lithuania in particular regarding food supplies and education, his service as a field chaplain, and his efforts to support and supply libraries for Prussian soldiers. The series contains, furthermore, various certificates of L. Rosenak, a typescript by L. Hoppe, Protestant field chaplain, titled "Ein Ostermorgen im Grossen Hauptquartier" (typescript, 3 pp.), and flyers in German and Yiddish inviting to services of L. Rosenak in Lida.
Dates: undated, 1902-1980

Lithuanian Jewish Communities Collection

 Collection
Identifier: RG 2
Abstract The Lithuanian Jewish Communities Collection is comprised of documents relating to Jewish cultural, religious, social, political, and economic life in approximately 150 towns in Lithuania. The bulk of the collection pertains to the period between 1919 and 1926, when elements of a system of Jewish national autonomy existed within the Lithuanian state, including a Ministry of Jewish Affairs and governmentally empowered Jewish community councils. Smaller parts of the collection relate to the periods before (1860-1918) and after (1927-1940) the autonomy.
Dates: 1860-1941

Raphael Family Papers

 Collection
Identifier: P-1029
Abstract This collection contains photographs and personal items of the Rafalowsky family as well as memorabilia and photographs of the Bialystoker Somech Noflim (Mutual Aid Society). Aaron Raphael was an active member in the Bialystoker Somech Noflim which operated in New York City in the early twentieth century. The Bialystoker groups were some of the most active Landmanshaftn or hometown organizations.
Dates: Undated, 1916-1950; Majority of material found within 1920 - 1930

Records of HIAS-HICEM Main Office in Europe

 Collection
Identifier: RG 245.5 (France I-IV)
Abstract This collection, which is a sub-group of RG 245 HIAS, includes the records of the main HICEM office in Europe prior to and during World War II. There are also some records from the post-war period relating to the dissolution of HICEM, HIAS’s taking over of HICEM’s operations and HIAS’s work with displaced persons.
Dates: 1924-1953; Majority of material found within 1935-1953

Records of the Briesen Jewish Community Council

 Collection
Identifier: RG 15
Abstract The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish community of Wąbrzeźno, known in German as Briesen. The records date from 1871 to 1921, concentrated in the era when the town of Briesen was part of the province of West Prussia, in the German Empire; only a handful of items date from the years 1920-1921, when the town was part of Poland. The collection comprises administrative and financial records kept by the Briesen Jewish Community Council, except for one volume of records kept by the Jüdischer Lese-Verein (Jewish Reading Society) of Briesen, in the years 1901 to 1908. Approximately 40% of the collection comprises financial records, 1882-1921, including official budgets and tax lists; 20% concerns the community's religious institutions; and another 20% comprises records related to community employees, especially rabbis and cantors. The remainder of the collection includes correspondence, communal meeting minutes and decisions, circulars announcing meetings, and a variety of administrative records. Included are records pertaining to communal council elections; synagogue seat rentals; burials and the care of graves; the construction and maintenance of the mikveh (ritual bath house); the expansion of the cemetery; synagogue rules and the renovation of the synagogue; charitable activities, often in cooperation with regional and national Jewish organizations; and the religious school and Jewish elementary school.
Dates: 1871-1921

Records of the Farband fun di Yidishe Studentn Fareynen in Daytshland (Verband Jüdischer Studentenvereine in Deutschland; Union of Jewish Student Associations in Germany)

 Collection
Identifier: RG 18
Abstract This collection contains the records of the Union of Jewish Student Associations in Germany (Yiddish: Farband fun di Yidishe Studentn Fareynen in Daytshland; German: Verband Jüdischer Studentenvereine in Deutschland), an umbrella organization of associations of East European Jewish students who were pursuing their education in cities throughout Germany in the 1920s. Along with the Union's records are the records of two of its affiliate associations, the Jewish Student Association in Berlin and the Jewish Student Association in Jena. The student associations and the umbrella organization that they founded aimed to further Jewish cultural life among members; to provide material assistance to members in need; and to advocate for the interests of members vis-à-vis state and academic authorities. Included are administrative records such as bylaws, minutes, and announcements; materials documenting membership meetings of the Berlin association and conferences of the umbrella organization; petitions and correspondence from members concerning financial aid; materials documenting libraries maintained by the students, and other activities; and general correspondence. Among the correspondents are Jewish charitable and social-welfare organizations that contributed to the support of East European Jewish students through the student associations, including the Yidishe Velt-Hilfs-Konferents (Conférence Universelle Juive de Secours, Paris), the Verband der Russischen Juden, the Hilfsverein der Deutschen Juden, and the Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der Deutschen Juden, as well as the Jewish Community of Berlin, and Jewish communities in other cities in Germany. The collection also includes a relatively small amount of materials of mixed provenance documenting the activities of other associations and umbrella organizations of East European Jewish students, both in Eastern Europe and the West, the greatest portion related to interwar Poland, especially Vilna.
Dates: 1913-1917, 1920-1939; Majority of material found within 1920-1930

Records of the Krotoszyn Jewish Community Council

 Collection
Identifier: RG 14
Abstract The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish community of Krotoszyn, known in German as Krotoschin. The records span the years 1828 to 1919, when the town was part of the Posen (Poznań) region of Prussia and, after 1871, of the German Empire; in 1919, it became part of newly independent Poland. The records are mainly those of the Jewish communal administration, or council, of Krotoschin, along with some records kept by communal voluntary associations, or, in one instance, the teacher of the Jewish elementary school. The collection consists predominantly of correspondence and minutes, with inclusion in some periods of documents such as tax lists and lists of eligible voters; records concerning charitable aid to community members and donations to external causes; and other types of documents, including insurance policies, mortgage records, debt repayment plan, and drawings/plans of property. Highlights include records related to property damage in a town fire of 1827; documentation of income and expenses for the year 1835; records of communal elections, 1834-1872; correspondence concerning marriages, 1838-1841, and requests for death certificates, 1834-1858; a small amount of material pertaining to the religious school, circa 1880s-1902; correspondence with regimental commanders of the German army regarding Jewish soldiers from the Krotoschin area, 1891-1910; applications for the position of rabbi, 1895, and cantor/shochet, 1904-1910; and continuous proceedings of the communal council in the period 1905 to 1913.
Dates: 1828-1919

Records of the Ostrowo Jewish Community Council

 Collection
Identifier: RG 13
Abstract The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish community of Ostrów Wielkopolski, today in west-central Poland, in the Greater Poland Voivodeship. The region was annexed by Prussia in 1793, in the Second Partition of Poland; in German the town was known as Ostrowo. The records date mainly from 1834 to 1919, with a few materials from as early as 1822. During this period the town was part of the Posen (Poznań) region of Prussia and, after 1871, of the German Empire; in 1919, it was incorporated into the Second Republic of Poland. The community numbered nearly 2,000 members in the late 19th century and declined steadily thereafter due to migration of members to larger German cities or overseas; only a small Jewish community remained during the interwar period. The records are mainly those of the Jewish communal administration, or council; a small amount of material pertains to several community voluntary organizations. Included are financial records such as budgets, balance sheets, and tax lists; communal minutes and decisions throughout the period; correspondence with the government, and, to a lesser extent, with Jewish organizations and other Jewish communities; records pertaining to community members' naturalizations, marriages, births, and synagogue seat contracts; petitions from individual community members, especially pertaining to charitable aid in the mid to late 19th century; records pertaining to communal educational and religious institutions; records on the hiring and employment of community rabbis,cantors, and other personnel, including application materials from candidates not hired; property records and mortgages; documentation of construction and renovation of communal buildings; records related to court cases, bequests, and estate and guardianship matters; and ephemera such as meeting notices and announcement fliers, as well as scattered clippings.
Dates: 1822-1919

Papers of Robison Family

 Collection
Identifier: P-678
Abstract The Robison Family Fapers reflect various activities of Adolf C. and Ann Green Robison in civic organizations, Jewish communal life, Jewish national and international affairs, and individually in the arts. The collection contains information on the origins of the United Nations; and on aid to Israel before, during, and after the War of Independence. The materials include correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, financial documents, newspaper clippings, photographs, diaries, scrapbooks, musical scores, and play scripts.
Dates: undated, 1904-1995

[Schnorrerbuch]

 Collection
Identifier: AR 2961 / MF 599
Abstract Handwritten fund raising book, German and Hebrew, with 700 names of various donors in multiple European cities.
Dates: Publication: 1838

Shalom Adler-Rudel Collection

 Collection
Identifier: LBIJER 159
Abstract The collection consists of 6 boxes and 46 folders.
Dates: 1918-1974

Shalom Schwarzbard Papers

 Collection
Identifier: RG 85
Abstract The collection contains the papers of Shalom Schwarzbard (1886-1938), the Russian-born French Jewish watchmaker, revolutionary, writer and activist for Jewish self-defense. In May 1926 in Paris, Schwarzbard assassinated the exiled Ukrainian nationalist leader Simon Petlyura, whom he held responsible for the pogroms against the Jews in the Ukraine in 1918-1921. His trial in October 1927, at which he was acquitted, drew worldwide attention. The collection consists of correspondence, manuscripts of Shalom Schwarzbard's autobiographical writings, personal documents, clippings, and printed ephemera, as well as poems by Schwarzbard's wife Anna and others. Materials in this collection mostly relate to Shalom Schwarzbard's writings, his speaking engagements following his acquittal, and his efforts in the 1930s to organize Jewish war veterans and war victims of the First World War.
Dates: 1891, 1912-1958; Majority of material found within 1920-1937

Vilna Collection

 Collection
Identifier: RG 29, Series 2
Abstract This collection consists of correspondence, reports, minutes of meetings, financial records, statistical surveys, election materials, announcements, flyers, and other materials related to Jewish life in Vilna during the inter-war period. Documents of earlier years are also included.
Dates: 1872, 1884, 1900-1940; Majority of material found within 1917-1940