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Geneva (Switzerland)

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 5 Collections and/or Records:

Adolf Wolfermann Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 1957
Abstract This collection mostly consists of personal correspondence, including communications from relatives and friends interned in concentration camps in France, Lublin, and Theresienstadt, and letters regarding the establishment of an agrarian training camp for Jews in Italy.
Dates: 1934-1962; Majority of material found in 1934-1946

Anneliese Riess Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 10019
Abstract This collection documents the life of Anneliese Riess and her family. The bulk of the collection contains correspondence that reflects the impact of fascism and anti-Semitic policies on her personal life and on her immediate family.
Dates: 1882-2001; Majority of material found in 1933-1948

Bund Foreign Committee Records

 Collection
Identifier: RG 1401
Abstract The collection contains the records of the Foreign Committee of the Bund, a Jewish political party espousing socialist democratic ideology as well as cultural Yiddishism and Jewish national autonomism. While a Central Committee led the Bund in the Russian empire, outside of Russia the party was represented by its Foreign Committee, which was based in Geneva, Switzerland. During the period when the Bund had no legal status or was semi-legal in Russia, the Foreign Committee assumed many important organizational functions of the party apparatus.
Dates: undated, 1890-1929; 1950; Majority of material found in 1898-1916

Fedor Ganz Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 7238
Abstract The collection contains documents, correspondence, unpublished writings, sketches, photos, and various flyers, postcards, posters, and a substantial amount of family documents.
Dates: 1870-1984

Richard Straus Family Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25680
Abstract This collection contains the documents of diplomat Richard Straus, his wife Elaine, and his son Alan in addition to documentation on his extended family members, especially including members of the Straus, Heimberger, and Niedermann families. The most prominent topics in the collection relate to Richard Straus's role as diplomat, family members' emigration and Holocaust experiences, and Alan Straus's early life, although material relating to family members' lives in Germany prior to the 1930s is also present. The collection includes extensive personal family correspondence and photographs; official, educational, and professional documents; family members' writings as well as articles about them; childhood and educational memorabilia; and documentation related to the deaths of family members.
Dates: 1925-2000; Majority of material found within 1940-1986