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Mexico

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 9 Collections and/or Records:

Alexander Mayer letters

 Collection — Consolidated Box P3, Folder: P-117
Identifier: P-117
Abstract Contains 27 letters, of which 16 are in German, written by Alexander Mayer from Panama, San Francisco, Sonora, Mexico, and Columbia, to his uncle Lazarus Mayer, and Edwin Bomeisler (1850-52). The collection deals largely with Mayer's efforts to establish a small clothing business in San Francisco. The letters were edited by Albert M. Friedenberg and printed in the Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society, vol. 31, pp. 135-71.
Dates: 1850-1852

Bertha Badt-Strauss Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 3945
Abstract The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence to Bertha Badt-Strauss from various writers and friends between 1940 and 1969. The letters deal with topics related to emigration/immigration, Judaism, Zionism and publishing opportunities in the United States and Mexico. Included are manuscripts, poems, photographs and clippings of Badt-Strauss's correspondents, as well as some of her own writings.
Dates: 1935-2011; Majority of material found within 1940-1969

Papers of Cecilia Razovsky

 Collection
Identifier: P-290
Abstract The papers consist of correspondence and reports of Cecelia Razovsky (married name: Davidson), noted social worker specializing in immigration and resettlement of refugees. The collection includes information about her work with the National Council of Jewish Women in the 1920s, and with the National Refugee Service (and predecessor organizations) in the 1930s. Information is included about her work as a Resettlement Supervisor in the post-World War II Displaced Persons camps in Europe, and as a field worker in the southwestern U.S. for the United Service for New Americans in 1950. The collection contains reports and correspondence from her trips to South America, primarily Brazil, to explore possibilities of refugee settlement in 1937 and 1946; as a representative for United HIAS Service to aid in settling Egyptian and Hungarian refugees in 1957-1958; and as a pleasure trip and evaluation of the changes in the Jewish community of the country in 1963. Also included in the collection are many of Razovsky's articles, plays, and pamphlets.
Dates: undated, 1913-1971

Hadassah Archives Subject File Records

 Collection
Identifier: I-578/RG 11
Abstract The Hadassah subject file record group is a collection of files of organizations, events, and genre subjects originally arranged alphabetically by Hadassah’s central filing department. These files served and serve as a ready reference source that represents both the direct and indirect involvement of Hadassah in both national and international affairs. This collection includes correspondence, clippings, newsletters, photographs, and other ephemeral documents.
Dates: 1920-2006; Majority of material found within 1940 - 1990

Judah P. Benjamin Collection

 Collection
Identifier: P-45
Abstract Judah P. Benjamin, called the "brains of the Confederacy", was a statesman and jurist in the United States, the Confederate States, and Great Britain. Benjamin achieved high-ranking titles wherever he served, and left an indelible mark in the South where he held more official positions than any other man during the Civil War. After the fall of the Confederacy, Benjamin fled to England, where he was admitted to the English bar, and later assumed a judgeship. In 1872, he was appointed the highest ranking of Queen's counselor.

This collection contains correspondence; letters; newspaper clippings; Confederate bank notes and bonds; Civil War memorabilia; pamphlets; and a bound copy of Benjamin's diary, kept from 1862-1864. These materials are of particular interest to researchers studying the activities and experiences of Jews in the antebellum South and under the brief reign of the Confederate States of America. Additionally, through the material relating to memorials and preservation endeavors for Benjamin, the collection also provides a look at the continued glorification of Confederate heroes in the South long into the twentieth century. The collection also contains pre-Civil War correspondence between Benjamin and Peter A. Hargous regarding the creation of a railroad line on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Mexico and the Tehuantepec Railroad Company of New Orleans.
Dates: undated, 1838, 1854-1884, 1893, 1925, 1930, 1942, 1948; Majority of material found within 1854-1884

Mexican Inquisition Collection

 Collection
Identifier: I-3
Abstract The Mexican Inquisition collection contains twenty-four processos (transcripts of trials) of individuals accused of Judaizing. The Mexican Inquisition tried accused Crypto-Jews, Jews who converted to Christianity but were believed to secretly practice Judaism. Eight of the processos are originals; sixteen are typed transcriptions from the Inquisition Records of the Archivo General de la Naciâon (Mexico). Three of the transcriptions are also translated into English (including two trials of the same individual). The trials range in date from 1572 to 1768.
Dates: undated, 1572-1914

OSE Photograph Collection

 Collection
Identifier: RG 494
Abstract This collection consists of photographs of OSE programs, OSE conferences and congresses and various individuals connected with OSE and its programs, mainly dating from World War II and the years just following. Many of these photographs are related to the work OSE does with children’s health and nutrition but there are also numerous pictures of leisure activities, care homes, vocational training, and education.
Dates: 1937-1962

Papers of Joseph A. D. Sutton

 Collection
Identifier: ASF AR-37
Abstract The collection documents the work and correspondence of Joseph A. D. Sutton and reflects various aspects of his life, personal research and writings in the field of Syrian Jewish culture and society, mainly as the Syrian Jews made their way in the United States. The collection also documents the Syrian Jewish experience of the immigrants who came to America and settled, as they are described in his two books: Magic Carpet: Aleppo-in-Flatbush and Aleppo Chronicles. An extensive portion of the collection examines the Syrian community which settled in Brooklyn, including articles by colleagues as well as correspondence.
Dates: 1756, 1850-1999 (bulk 1979-1993)

Records of the Industrial Removal Office

 Collection
Identifier: I-91
Abstract The Industrial Removal Office was created as part of the Jewish Agricultural Society to assimilate immigrants into American society, both economically and culturally. It worked to employ all Jewish immigrants. The collection contains administrative and financial records, immigrants' removal records, and correspondence. A database has been constructed to search for persons removed by the Industrial Removal Office.
Dates: undated, 1899-1922