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World War, 1939-1945 -- Jews

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 10 Collections and/or Records:

American Jewish Conference, records

 Collection
Identifier: I-67
Abstract The collection contains background materials pertaining to the formation of the Conference, the election of delegates, financial records, memoranda, reports, and incomplete minutes of the Conference and its committees. It also includes extensive correspondence of the Administrative Secretary Jesse B. Calmenson, for March-December, 1943. The major portion of the collection consists of transcripts of the first through fourth sessions (1943-1947) of the Plenum and committees of the Conference. The published material in the collection includes the Bulletin of the activities and Digest of the press.
Dates: undated, 1943-1949

Coordinating Committee of Jewish Organizations Dealing with Employment Discrimination in War Industries, records

 Collection
Identifier: I-169
Abstract Collection contains the minutes of meetings of various committees, position papers, and correspondence with agencies and individuals.
Dates: undated, 1940-1945

General Jewish Council Records

 Collection
Identifier: I-170
Abstract The General Jewish Council was an umbrella organization founded by the American Jewish Committee, American Jewish Congress, B’nai B’rith, and Jewish Labor Committee in order to coordinate their rights defense activities.

The bulk of the records in this collection date between from 1938-1944, the active years of the Council. Materials consist primarily of correspondence, minutes, memoranda, and reports.
Dates: 1934-1947

Martin Younker correspondence

 Collection
Identifier: P-713
Abstract Correspondence of Martin Younker with family and friends, primarily during his time as a U.S. Army serviceman (stationed in U.S. and in Europe), 1941-1945.
Dates: undated, 1938-1948

National Refugee Service Records

 Collection
Identifier: RG 248
Abstract This collection contains the records of the National Refugee Service (NRS), a refugee aid organization founded in New York City in 1939 to assist refugees fleeing Nazi persecution. A successor agency to the National Coordinating Committee for Aid to Refugees and Emigrants Coming from Germany, which had operated as an umbrella organization of refugee aid agencies since 1934, the NRS remained in existence until 1946, when it was merged into the new organization United Service for New Americans. The NRS program encompassed a migration service that assisted with affidavits, visas and other legal aspects of the immigration process; temporary relief and casework services; job placement, retraining, and small business loans; help in resettling to localities throughout the country; and social and cultural adjustment to American life. The records include minutes, correspondence, memoranda, and reports related to the board of directors; the executive director; lay advisory committees; the various departments within the NRS; special committees assisting professional groups, including physicians, musicians, rabbis, social workers, and scholars; and cooperating refugee-assistance committees and organizations across the United States.
Dates: 1934-1952; Majority of material found within 1939-1946

National Jewish Welfare Board Bureau of War Records

 Collection
Identifier: I-52
Abstract Collection includes approximately 85,000 individual service files and 320,000 surrogate index cards collected by the BWR and the Greater New York War Records Committee on behalf of Jewish soldiers and sailors who served in World War II. The BWR also conducted surveys of Jewish doctors, dentists, farmers and refugees who served in the United States Armed Forces and compiled population studies for cities containing Jewish populations greater than 25,000, among them Trenton, N.J. and New York City. The individual service files typically provide a soldier's name, age, rank, serial number, service branch, home address, civilian occupation, next of kin, awards and casualties. These files contain supporting documentation culled from newspapers, telephone conversations, and correspondence exchanged among BWR staff and volunteers, service personnel and their families, and representatives of the United States Armed Forces.

The alphabetical master cards series serves as an abbreviated, annotated index for the more substantial individual service files of Jewish service personnel who won awards or suffered casualties during the war. The Bureau maintained correspondence files for permanent staff members including Salo Baron, Edward Burnstein, Louis Dublin, Elisha Friedman, Dr. Maurice Hexter, Rabbi Edward Israel, Samuel Kohs, Louis Kraft, Samuel Leff, Harry Lurie, Herbert Marks, Benjamin Rabinowitz, Philip Schiff, Selma Schnaper, Jerome Seidman, David Turtletaub, Frank Weil, Milton Weill, Arthur Weyne, and Joseph Zubin.

The Bureau also preserved correspondence with representatives of local war records committees, religious, and community service organizations including the United Service Organization, Jewish Community Centers, Hebrew Associations, and the National Refugee Service, as well as publishers, alumni associations, and military personnel from the offices of United States Army, Navy, and Quartermaster General's office.

It retained copies of published and printed materials including studies, lists, guides, forms, and cards. Among the vital records are charts depicting the BWR administrative hierarchy; personnel and staff records; lists of volunteers and field representatives employed throughout the United States; minutes of meetings; annual, quarterly, and special reports; budget materials; and policies and procedures implemented during the war records program.
Dates: undated, 1940-1969; Majority of material found within 1943 - 1946

Noah Benevolent Society Records

 Collection
Identifier: I-186
Abstract The Noah Benevolent Society (1849-1980), named after Judge Mordechai M. Noah, provided mutual relief for members, their wives and orphans, and helped with internment costs and burial plots at Cypress Hills and other New York cemeteries. The Society also provided relief for Jews in Morocco and Jerusalem and donated funds to several Jewish charitable institutions as well as the Association for the Advancement of Blind Children. The Society disbanded in 1980 due to dwindling membership. The records of the Noah Benevolent Society contain membership minutes and books, donation and financial records, constitutions and by-laws, newsletters, memorabilia, and photographs.
Dates: undated, 1852-1979

Papers of Philip Friedman (1901-1960)

 Collection
Identifier: RG 1258
Abstract This collection contains the personal and professional papers of historian and bibliographer Philip Friedman. These materials include correspondence with individuals and with organizations, newspaper clippings, subject files, manuscripts of works by Friedman and by others, and some of Friedman’s personal documents. These materials relate to Friedman’s work on the histories of various Jewish communities, particularly those in Poland, and his work gathering source documents about the Holocaust.
Dates: 1914-1993; Majority of material found within 1930-1960

Shanghai Collection

 Collection
Identifier: RG 243
Abstract The collection relates to the life of Jewish refugees, mostly of German and Austrian origin, in Shanghai primarily between the years 1939-1948. It covers many aspects of their experience, including political and cultural events, relief and charity activities, and self-help. The collection originated from the YIVO exhibition that was organized and displayed in 1947 in Shanghai and later in New York. The collection consists of manuscripts, minutes of meetings, correspondence, newspaper clippings, and printed materials.
Dates: 1924-1950; Majority of material found within 1939-1948

Werner Tom Angress Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25321 / MF 924 Reels 1-11
Abstract This collection holds documents relating to the work of history professor Werner Tom Angress, as well as some that provide information on his refugee and wartime experiences. Among the papers of this collection are extensive research material, correspondence and articles by him, students' manuscripts, and papers pertaining to the Gross-Breesen training farm for Jewish emigrants.
Dates: 1904-1994; Majority of material found within 1950-1980