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Oscar Meyer Family Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25056

Scope and Content Note

The collection contains documents related to Oscar, Cypora née Bendik, Marya, and Gerd Meyer (later Gad Meiry). Included are family photographs, residency records from Essen, business records, Gestapo files, the passport of Gerd Meyer, and records of the seizure of the Meyer estate used by Asher Meiry to file restitution claims on behalf of his grandfather Oscar. All documents are photocopies. Alongside documents on the abovementioned Meyer family members, the records of the seizure of the Meyer estate include documents regarding the following individuals: Jenny Bendik née Mendelson, Jenny Eichberg, Berta Goldschmidt, Rosa Goldschmidt, Ilse Gompertz, and Max Gompertz.

Dates

  • 1920-2001
  • Majority of material found within 1933-1943

Creator

Language of Materials

The collection is in German and English.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open to researchers.

Access Information

Readers may access the collection by visiting the Lillian Goldman Reading Room at the Center for Jewish History. We recommend reserving the collection in advance; please visit the LBI Online Catalog and click on the "Request" button.

Biographical Note

Oscar Meyer was born in Aachen, Germany on October 23, 1885 to Moses Meyer and his wife Henriette. Oscar worked as a self-employed businessman at the men’s clothing factory Heumann and Meyer. On April 9, 1923, he married Cypora (sometimes spelled Carola or Karola) Bendik (sometimes spelled Bendick), who was born February 12, 1902.

Their son Gerd Meyer was born in Essen on July 25, 1924, and their daughter Marya (sometimes spelled Marga) was born August 8, 1925. The family lived at 8 Ruthstrasse in Essen.

From 1933 until the family’s deportation, Oscar Meyer was arrested several times by the Gestapo. According to his Gestapo file, Meyer attempted to leave Germany for business in 1937 but was denied a visa.

Oscar was able to secure passage for his son Gerd to England in 1939, where Gerd completed his schooling and joined the British army to fight against Germany.

Oscar, Cypora, and Marya Meyer were deported to Poland on October 27, 1941 and were reportedly shot outside Łódź.

Gerd Meyer moved to Israel after the war and changed his name to Gad Meiry. He later immigrated to the United States. He eventually married and had a son, Asher Benjamin (sometimes spelled Benyamin, born July 1, 1961). Asher brought restitution claims on behalf of his grandfather Oscar Meyer in the early 2000s.

Extent

0.25 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection documents the experience of the Meyer family with a focus on the years from 1933 to 1943. Oscar Meyer was a successful businessman in Essen, Germany. Unable to escape National Socialist persecution himself, he was able to send his son Gerd to England in 1939. Oscar, his wife Cypora née Bendik (alternatively Carola or Karola Bendick), and their daughter Marya (alternatively Marga) were taken to Poland on October 26, 1941 and perished outside Łódź. Gerd joined the British army to fight Germany in 1944. After the war, he moved to Israel, changed his name to Gad Meiry, and later immigrated to the United States. The collection contains photocopies of family photographs, residency records from Essen, business records, Gestapo files, the passport of Gerd Meyer, and records of the seizure of the Meyer estate used for restitution claims.

Arrangement

The collection was organized by document type and arranged chronologically.

Digitization Note

This collection was digitized and made accessible in its entirety.

Related Material

In 2010, Gad Meiry wrote an autobiography titled The Journey from Essen. The table of contents and some pages are available through Google Books: The Journey from Essen.

Processing Information

The materials were donated as photocopies.
Title
Guide to the Oscar Meyer Family Collection (1920-2001) (bulk 1933-1943) AR 25056
Status
In Progress
Author
Processed by Leanora Lange
Date
© 2012
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
Description is in English.
Sponsor
Described, encoded, and digitized as part of the CJH Holocaust Resource Initiative, made possible by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany.

Repository Details

Part of the Leo Baeck Institute Repository

Contact:
15 West 16th Street
New York NY 10011 United States