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Hans Eltzbacher Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 3623 / MF 649

Scope and Content Note

Financial, business, and personal papers of the Eltzbacher family and related families, including correspondence, architectural plans, financial ledgers, wills and testaments, clippings, and eulogies; of particular interest is the business correspondence of Count Aloys zu Kaunitz-Rietberg with the banker Jacob Loeb Eltzbacher (1758-1825), who was based in Neuenkirchen, Westphalia, along with supporting documents and records; material on the career of the lawyer Carl Eltzbacher (1854-1936), including clippings on his candidacy to the Cologne city council in 1903 and correspondence, including a letter from Konrad Adenauer.

Reports, by-laws, and other material on the Jewish hospital in Cologne and the Israelitisches Asyl fuer Kranke und Altersschwache, Cologne, in the twentieth century.

See Inventory list

Dates

  • 1781-1971

Creator

Language of Materials

This collection is in German, Hebrew.

Access Restrictions

Collection is microfilmed, use MF 649.

Access Information

Collection is digitized. Follow the link(s) in the Container List to access the digitized materials.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact:

Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011

email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

Biographical Note

Hans Eltzbacher was born in Cologne on November 30, 1893, to Carl and Rosy Eltzbacher. The Eltzbacher family had been active in the banking industry since the 18th century. He attended grammar school and passed his leaving examination in Cologne. He wanted to become an artist, but started to study law in Munich according to his father's wishes. He practiced law in Cologne until 1933, when Jews were no longer admitted to the bar. In his spare time, he took painting lessons and met many artists, among them Max Liebermann, who confirmed his talent for painting. After an incident, which was provoked by a critic during an exhibition, he avoided introducing his work to the public. His next exhibition took place in Caracas thirty years later.

In 1937, Hans Eltzbacher and his brother Arthur moved to Brussels. In 1940, after the German occupation, both were deported to St. Cyprien. Arthur Eltzbacher died during the transport. Hans Eltzbacher's lawyer managed to have him discharged from the camp and Eltzbacher moved to Switzerland. After the war he came back to Brussels to find his house completely ravaged.

Hans Eltzbacher died in 1969 was buried in Laeken, a suburb of Brussels.

Extent

0.75 Linear Feet

Abstract

Financial, business, and personal papers of the Eltzbacher family and related families, including correspondence, architectural plans, financial ledgers, wills and testaments, clippings, and eulogies; of particular interest is the business correspondence of Count Aloys zu Kaunitz-Rietberg with the banker Jacob Loeb Eltzbacher (1758-1825), who was based in Neuenkirchen, Westphalia, along with supporting documents and records; material on the career of the lawyer Carl Eltzbacher (1854-1936), including clippings on his candidacy to the Cologne city council in 1903 and correspondence, including a letter from Konrad Adenauer.

Other Finding Aid

12-page inventory.

Microfilm

Collection is available on 1 reel of microfilm (MF 649).

Existence and Location of Copies

Available on microfilm

Separated Material

Photographs have been removed to the LBI Photograph Collection.

Title
Guide to the Hans Eltzbacher Collection, 1781-1971 AR 3623 / MF 649
Status
In Progress
Author
Processed by LBI Staff
Date
© 2009
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
Description is in English.

Revision Statements

  • November 03, 2011 : Link(s) to digital objects added in Container List.

Repository Details

Part of the Leo Baeck Institute Repository

Contact:
15 West 16th Street
New York NY 10011 United States