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Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York

 Organization

Found in 8 Collections and/or Records:

Educational Alliance Records

 Collection
Identifier: RG 312
Abstract The Educational Alliance functioned as a settlement house on New York’s Lower East Side beginning in 1889, eventually evolving into a community center in the 1920s. The Educational Alliance Records most comprehensively document the aims and activities of the Educational Alliance following WWII and into the 1960s, beginning with Mordecai Kessler’s tenure as Executive Director in 1945. However, meeting minutes and legal documents date back to 1879. Materials include minutes, correspondence, individual records, newsletters, photographs, announcements, deeds, clippings, reports, and financial records.
Dates: 1879-1968; Majority of material found within 1945-1967

Graenum Berger Papers

 Collection
Identifier: P-717
Abstract The Papers of Graenum Berger (1908-1999) document Berger's involvement with Ethiopian Jewry and his efforts to bring about their rescue from Ethiopia through his organization, the American Association for Ethiopian Jews (AAEJ). The Papers also contain materials regarding Berger's other interests-his writings, his travels throughout the world, his community affiliations, his career as a Jewish social work executive, his commitment to Jewish causes, and his commitment to Israel. Also included are personal and biographical materials from his many long-term friendships and associations; correspondence, minutes, reports, clippings, manuscripts, research materials, journal articles, photographs, and publications.
Dates: undated, [1825]-2002 (bulk 1923-2001)

Guides to other archives

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25054
Abstract Guides to archives and special collections in the USA, Europe and Israel that were sent to and/or collected by LBI archivists over the years.
Dates: 1932-1998

Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York Records

 Collection
Identifier: I-42
Abstract Hebrew Orphan Asylum was founded in 1822 as the Hebrew Benevolent Society. It underwent various changes of name until 1906, and merged with The Jewish Child Care Association of New York in 1940. The collection includes extensive administrative records including financial statements, property records, Board, Committee, and Executive minutes, donation books, publications, and state and government correspondence and reports. The collection also includes children's admission and discharge ledgers, medical records, and conduct books. Also within the collection are childcare studies, dedication speeches, writings by alumni, oral histories, newspaper and magazine clippings, and photographs.
Dates: undated, 1855-2013; Majority of material found within 1900 - 1940

Jack D. Weiler and Family Papers

 Collection
Identifier: P-1045
Content Description The Jack D. Weiler and Family Papers are divided into two sub-groups: one containing most of JDW's personal records, including materials related to the Lenru Men's Club; JDW's philanthrophy in regards to the many organizations he worked with; items related to his work as part of the real estate firm, Swig, Weiler, and Arnow; and also includes a large number of photographs related to his meetings, dedications, campaigns, and building funds for Israel Bonds, UJA, and Federation. Last in this sub-group are books dedicated to JDW or Robert Arnow, and several small, pocket-sized booklets on subjects varying from toasts to Jewish law to care of the back.

The second sub-group is dedicated to the family of Jack D. Weiler and his wife, milliner designer Doris (née Person) Weiler, and their children, Joan and Alan. While the sub-group does contain many images and outings with Joan's husband and Jack's business partner, Robert Arnow and the children of Alan and Helene Weiler, this is primarily due to marriage into the Weiler family, and therefore the series relates more to the Weilers, with major evidence of Jack and Doris's grand- and in some cases, their great-grandchildren.

The sub-group also documents the family circles of Weiler and Person families, including the brothers and sisters of Jack and Doris, but primarily documents the family of Faivel and Chana Weiler. This sub-group contains correspondence, primarily between Jack and Doris and their children; general personal papers relating to the lives of Jack and Doris; and a large cache of family photos dating from the mid-1920s to the early 2000s.

A seperate series of Audio-Visual Materials rounds out the collection.
Dates: 1920 - 2014; Majority of material found within 1910 - 1990

Jonah J. Goldstein Papers

 Collection
Identifier: P-61
Abstract The Jonah J. Goldstein Papers chronicle Goldstein’s roles as a New York City judge (1931-1956) as he pushed for court reform in the 1930s; as he lead and founded local organizations, especially those devoted to the prevention of juvenile delinquency in the Jewish community; as the New York City mayoral candidate on the Liberal-Republican-City Fusion ticket in 1945; and as a voice for drug law reform in the 1950s and 1960s.

Materials include correspondence, speeches, scrapbooks, photographs, awards, campaign posters, audiotapes and clippings.
Dates: 1890-1967

Noah Benevolent Society Records

 Collection
Identifier: I-186
Abstract The Noah Benevolent Society (1849-1980), named after Judge Mordechai M. Noah, provided mutual relief for members, their wives and orphans, and helped with internment costs and burial plots at Cypress Hills and other New York cemeteries. The Society also provided relief for Jews in Morocco and Jerusalem and donated funds to several Jewish charitable institutions as well as the Association for the Advancement of Blind Children. The Society disbanded in 1980 due to dwindling membership. The records of the Noah Benevolent Society contain membership minutes and books, donation and financial records, constitutions and by-laws, newsletters, memorabilia, and photographs.
Dates: undated, 1852-1979

United Jewish Appeal-Federation of New York collection

 Collection
Identifier: I-433
Abstract United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York is the organization that resulted from the mergers of various New York federations with the New York office of UJA. UJA-Federation and its predecessor organizations have been a central force for communal planning and philanthropy in the New York Jewish community since 1917, and in overseas Jewish communities since 1939. The largest section of this collection covers the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies and its predecessor organizations in Manhattan, the Bronx and Brooklyn. Important subject areas include Federation’s work with their affiliated agencies including detailed budget files through most of the 20th century; UJA’s programs in Israel and campaigns in New York during the 1960s and 1970s; an overview of the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign 1974-1986; and the day to day work of the successfully merged organizations 1986-2000.
Dates: 1909-2004