Skip to main content

Mosse Family Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 25184

Scope and Content Note

The collection of the Mosse family represents an excellent source for researchers investigating the social and economic ascent of Jewish families during the German state building and Imperial period, stretching over four generations. The most represented from this family is the line of Marcus Mosse's son Rudolf Mosse, the publisher and entrepreneur, his daughter, Felicia, and the three grandchildren Rudolf, Hilde, and George Lachmann-Mosse. Some material on other lines, namely the offspring of Emil and Albert Mosse, can also be found here. The papers of Martha Mosse, daughter of Albert Mosse, deserve to be mentioned in this respect.

The founder of the extended clan, Marcus Mosse, was a local country physician. He held the education and social security of his eight sons and six daughters in high regard and despite his rather modest economic situation he made arrangements in order to secure both for them. Since Marcus Mosse's activity in 1848 one can observe a continuous strain of allegiance to the liberal principals of the German Bildungsbürgertum that was later represented on the pages of the Berliner Tageblatt founded by his son Rudolf Mosse. The views of many members of the Mosse family can be analyzed in the correspondence that is held in the collection, most notably the letters of Marcus Mosse, Albert Mosse, Rudolf Mosse, and Hilde Lachmann-Mosse. Correspondence is the most prominent genre of the collection, both in the form of personal correspondence in the subgroup of personal papers and as part of the subgroup of business records of the family enterprises.

Various awards and acknowledgments that were granted to individual members for their social activities underscore the significance of the family as a whole. Rudolf Mosse distinguished himself as an entrepreneur and benefactor who displayed social concerns and generously donated for charitable and social purposes. Albert Mosse participated in drafting the Japanese constitution, several trade agreements, and several other legal drafts of the Japanese government, and after his retirement served on the Berlin municipal council. Other brothers and sisters also had significant impact on their communities, both as academics, businessmen, or as members of various social and charitable committees. Many members of the family participated in the life of the Berlin Jewish Reform community, namely Rudolf Mosse, Albert Mosse, Hans Lachmann-Mosse, and his daughter and grand daughter of Rudolf Mosse, Hilde Lachmann-Mosse.

Besides correspondence and personal items, the collection also contains newspaper clippings documenting various events pertaining to the individual members of the family or to the family business. One can also find a number of images, mostly portraits that were removed to the Photograph Collection of the Leo Baeck Institute.

The collection contains some business records of the firm Rudolf Mosse, mostly from the 1920s and 1930s. The founder and owner of the Rudolf Mosse enterprise, Rudolf Mosse died in 1920. His son-in-law, Hans Lachmann-Mosse, inherited 50% of the Berliner Tageblatt and his wife and the only daughter of Rudolf Mosse, Felicia, the rest. Rudolf Mosse stipulated in his will the positions of his cousins Martin Carbe and Theodor Wolff as managing director and editor-in-chief, respectively. Hans Lachmann-Mosse pushed forward expansive investments into advertising abroad, real-estate, and art cinemas. However, the company could not sustain such expansion and later economic depression and political changes in Germany resulted in serious problems. The collection documents efforts of the management to secure some of the assets and assure further existence of at least some business assets.

The records consist of business correspondence, newspaper clippings, and several publications on the management practices in the Rudolf Mosse company. The records of the Zürich branch, where some of the activities of the Berlin central office were transferred once Hans Lachmann-Mosse and his family left Berlin in 1933, are the most prominent part of that subgroup. The director of the Zürcher branch, Alfred Schwabacher, also coordinated most of the activities in the other European division and was instrumental in rescuing parts of the Mosse family and company property. Other European offices are represented only sporadically.

Dates

  • 1676-2001
  • Majority of material found within 1828-1982

Creator

Language of Materials

The collection is in German, English, Polish, Japanese, and several documents are in Latin and classic Greek.

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Access Information

Collection is digitized. Follow the links in the Container List to access the digitized materials.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact

Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011

email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

Biographical Notes

Mosse, Albert Albert Mosse was born on October 1, 1846 in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) to Marcus Mosse and Ulrike Mosse (neé Wolff). Having graduated from the grammar school in Lissa (then Germany, now Leszno, Poland) and Guben (Germany), Albert Mosse studied law at the University of Berlin in 1865 thanks to the financial support of his older brothers Salomon and Theodor. He finished his studies in 1868 and entered the ranks of the Prussian state administration. During the Franco-Prussian war 1870/1871 Albert Mosse volunteered for the Prussian army.

After working in several court offices on various levels Albert Mosse became a judge of the county court (Kreisgericht) in Spandau, Germany in 1876. Eventually, he was appointed judge of the state court (Landrichter, Landgerichtsrat), which was the highest position an unbaptized Jew could achieve at that time.

While serving as a judge in Berlin, he held lectures on public law for Japanese lawyers and diplomats. When the Japanese government decided to modernize Japan's legal system after the Prussian-German model, Albert Mosse was a natural choice for a legal expert due to his contacts with the Japanese embassy. He signed a three-year contract and together with his family left Germany for Japan in 1886. Albert Mosse participated in preparatory work for the new Japanese constitution and worked on other important legal drafts, international agreements, and contracts. The law on local self-government from 1888 was among the most significant of these. After the new Japanese constitution was enacted in 1889, Albert Mosse returned to Germany.

He was appointed state supreme court judge in Königsberg (then East Prussia, now Kaliningrad, Russia) in 1890. He also served as an honorary professor of civil and commerce law at the University of Königsberg. The university named him Doctor iuris honoris causa in 1903.

After his retirement in 1907, Albert Mosse returned to Berlin and became involved in communal politics. He served on the Board of City Council and advised the Berlin municipal administration on various legal matters. He also served as the vice-president of the Verband der deutschen Juden (the Union of German Jews) and president of the Board of the Hochschule für die Wissenschaft der Judentums (College for Jewish Studies) in Berlin.

Albert Mosse died on May 30, 1925 in Berlin, Germany.

Mosse, Marcus Marcus Mosse was born in 1808 in Märkisch-Friedland (then Lower Lusatia, Germany, now Miroslawiec, Poland). His father Salomon Moses (Marcus Mosse changed his last name) died three years later in 1811 and his mother Henriette (Jüttel) neé Markus (Levin) remarried his business partner Jacob Fuchs. He entered the grammar school (Gymnasium) in Luckau in 1822 and finished in 1829. He started medical studies at the university in Berlin and received his medical degree in 1832. In 1836 Marcus Mosse married Ulrike Wolff. They had fourteen children - eight sons and six daughters.

In 1833 he was appointed as a municipal physician for the poor in Spremberg (Lusatia, Germany), but two years later he signed a contract with the Jewish community in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) and functioned as a practical physician for the local Jewish poor. He soon achieved a place of prominence in Grätz and was appointed to the town council from where he later resigned. In the revolutionary year 1848 he strongly supported the liberal movement and his pro-Polish attitudes earned him a police interrogation and incarceration. After his release Marcus Mosse returned to his practice.

Marcus Mosse died after a long heart illness on November 10, 1865.

Mosse, Rudolf Rudolf Mosse was born on May 8, 1843 in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) to Marcus Mosse and Ulrike Mosse (neé Wolff). He attended the grammar school in Lissa (then Germany, now Leszno, Poland), but for economic reasons he did not finish. At the age of fifteen he became a bookstore apprentice in Posen (then Prussia, Germany; now Poznan, Poland). After a short period in Berlin, where he stayed with his oldest brother Salomon, he started working for the publisher of the magazine Gartenlaube, Robert Apitsch, in Leipzig, Saxony. There he came up with idea of soliciting advertisements and established a dedicated advertising supplement to the publication. His idea proved to be a commercial success.

On January 1, 1867 Rudolf Mosse opened his own newspaper advertising agency (Zeitungs-Annoncen Expedition) in Berlin. Soon he opened several independent branches in Germany, i.e. Munich (München), Stuttgart, and Hamburg, but also abroad Basel, Zürich, Vienna, and Prague. By 1917 the company had 18 independent branches and 280 agencies both in Germany and abroad.

In 1873, Rudolf Mosse married the daughter of a businessman, Benjamin Loewenstein, Emilie, in Trier. Soon thereafter they adopted Felicia (neé Marx).

Despite the economic success of his advertisement business, of broader notoriety is Rudolf Mosse's connection to the leading liberal daily the Berliner Tageblatt that he founded in 1871. It was originally founded as a commercial periodical, but under the leadership of the editor-in-chief Arthur Levysohn, who joined the Berliner Tageblatt in 1881, the political news section was organized, and the paper took on a liberal character. Arthur Levysohn retired in 1906. He was succeeded by Rudolf Mosse's cousin and correspondent of the Berliner Tageblatt from Paris, Theodor Wolff. Under his influence the paper became the stalwart of the left liberalism in Germany.

Besides the Berliner Tageblatt Rudolf Mosse acquired several other newspapers in Berlin, Germany, i.e Berliner Morgen-Zeitung , and Berliner Volks-Zeitung. Rudolf Mosse also controlled several publications abroad, among others Zürcher Post (Zürich, Switzerland), Deutsche Warschauer Zeitung (Warsaw, Poland), or Balkanska Poshta (Sofia, Bulgaria). In addition to daily newspapers, Rudolf Mosse's company published circa 130 professional and trade periodicals. It also had a book publishing division and its own printing house.

The charitable and art-patronage activities of Rudolf Mosse also deserve mentioning. Together with his wife Emilie Mosse he founded a home for children of impoverished families, the "Emilie- und Rudolf Mosse-Stiftung" in Wilmersdorf (Germany). He opened a hospital in Grätz and established an insurance fund for his employees. His gifts to various educational and public institutions were recognized with an honorary degree from the University of Heidelberg. Rudolf Mosse also served on the board of the Berlin Jewish Reform Community.

With the changed social and economic situation in Germany after the First World War, Rudolf Mosse withdrew from public life and died on September 8, 1920 in Schenkendorf, Germany.

Lachmann-Mosse, Hans Hans Lachmann-Mosse was born on August 9, 1885 in Berlin to industrialist Georg Lachmann and Hedwig (neé Eltzbacher). He studied law in Freiburg im Breisgau and Berlin. In 1909 he married the only (adoptive) daughter of the press magnate Rudolf Mosse; later their last names were united. He served in the German army throughout the First World War.

He worked for the Rudolf Mosse publishing house beginning in 1910, developing and administrating the social and charitable activities of the Rudolf Mosse company. After the death of his father-in-law in 1920 he took over managerial responsibilities as well as partial ownership of the concern. He tried to expand the business, but his investments were not always met with the approval of others in the top management, including the editor-in-chief of the Berliner Tageblatt, Theodor Wolff. The economic difficulties in which the Rudolf Mosse company found itself at the end of the 1920s were made even worse by the depression in Germany at the beginning of the 1930s. In 1933 the NSDAP seized control over its business in Germany.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse left Germany for France in 1933. He divorced in 1939 and soon after married Karola Strauch on March 23, 1939. Later, they emigrated to the United States and settled in California.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse sat on the Board of the Reform Jewish community in Berlin and presided over its liturgy commission. Some of the restitution material in this collection relates to the reform Jewish liturgy. He also was an art collector and benefactor. In 1923 he commissioned Erich Mendelsohn to renovate of the Rudolf Mosse edifice in Berlin.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse died on April 18, 1944 in Oakland, California.

Lachmann-Mosse, Hilde Hilde Lachmann-Mosse was born in Berlin as the daughter of Hans and Felicia Lachmann-Mosse on January 28, 1912. She attended the Staatliche August-Schule in Berlin between 1919-1931. Thereafter she studied medicine, first at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg im Breisgau, later in Bonn. After the NSDAP take-over in Germany she continued her studies at the University of Basel (Basler Universität), Switzerland, where she received her medical degree in 1938.

During her studies in Berlin she participated in the Jugendgemeinschaft der Jüdischen Reformgemeinde (Youth Association of the Berlin Reform Jewish Community) that was traditionally supported by her family. Hilde Lachmann-Mosse was always interested in social issues. When she studied in Basel, she participated in relief efforts on behalf of the German emigrés, particularly physicians. In 1938, she left Switzerland for the United States.

Hilde Lachmann Mosse's original specialization was pediatrics, but soon she became interested in child-psychology and psychiatry. Together with Fredric Wertham she founded the Lafargue Clinic in Harlem, New York, which was the first free mental health clinic on the eastern coast of the United States. Another of her research interests was reading disorders. She was also captivated by the relationship of violence and mass media.

Later, Hilde Lachmann-Mosse became a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the New York Medical College. She lectured as Fulbright Professor for Child Psychiatry at the University of Marburg, Germany in 1964-1965.

Her book The complete handbook of children's reading disorders was published posthumously.

Hilde Lachmann-Mosse died on January 15, 1982 in New York.

Mosse, Albert

Albert Mosse was born on October 1, 1846 in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) to Marcus Mosse and Ulrike Mosse (neé Wolff). Having graduated from the grammar school in Lissa (then Germany, now Leszno, Poland) and Guben (Germany), Albert Mosse studied law at the University of Berlin in 1865 thanks to the financial support of his older brothers Salomon and Theodor. He finished his studies in 1868 and entered the ranks of the Prussian state administration. During the Franco-Prussian war 1870/1871 Albert Mosse volunteered for the Prussian army.

After working in several court offices on various levels Albert Mosse became a judge of the county court (Kreisgericht) in Spandau, Germany in 1876. Eventually, he was appointed judge of the state court (Landrichter, Landgerichtsrat), which was the highest position an unbaptized Jew could achieve at that time.

While serving as a judge in Berlin, he held lectures on public law for Japanese lawyers and diplomats. When the Japanese government decided to modernize Japan's legal system after the Prussian-German model, Albert Mosse was a natural choice for a legal expert due to his contacts with the Japanese embassy. He signed a three-year contract and together with his family left Germany for Japan in 1886. Albert Mosse participated in preparatory work for the new Japanese constitution and worked on other important legal drafts, international agreements, and contracts. The law on local self-government from 1888 was among the most significant of these. After the new Japanese constitution was enacted in 1889, Albert Mosse returned to Germany.

He was appointed state supreme court judge in Königsberg (then East Prussia, now Kaliningrad, Russia) in 1890. He also served as an honorary professor of civil and commerce law at the University of Königsberg. The university named him Doctor iuris honoris causa in 1903.

After his retirement in 1907, Albert Mosse returned to Berlin and became involved in communal politics. He served on the Board of City Council and advised the Berlin municipal administration on various legal matters. He also served as the vice-president of the Verband der deutschen Juden (the Union of German Jews) and president of the Board of the Hochschule für die Wissenschaft der Judentums (College for Jewish Studies) in Berlin.

Albert Mosse died on May 30, 1925 in Berlin, Germany.

Mosse, Marcus

Marcus Mosse was born in 1808 in Märkisch-Friedland (then Lower Lusatia, Germany, now Miroslawiec, Poland). His father Salomon Moses (Marcus Mosse changed his last name) died three years later in 1811 and his mother Henriette (Jüttel) neé Markus (Levin) remarried his business partner Jacob Fuchs. He entered the grammar school (Gymnasium) in Luckau in 1822 and finished in 1829. He started medical studies at the university in Berlin and received his medical degree in 1832. In 1836 Marcus Mosse married Ulrike Wolff. They had fourteen children - eight sons and six daughters.

In 1833 he was appointed as a municipal physician for the poor in Spremberg (Lusatia, Germany), but two years later he signed a contract with the Jewish community in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) and functioned as a practical physician for the local Jewish poor. He soon achieved a place of prominence in Grätz and was appointed to the town council from where he later resigned. In the revolutionary year 1848 he strongly supported the liberal movement and his pro-Polish attitudes earned him a police interrogation and incarceration. After his release Marcus Mosse returned to his practice.

Marcus Mosse died after a long heart illness on November 10, 1865.

Mosse, Rudolf

Rudolf Mosse was born on May 8, 1843 in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) to Marcus Mosse and Ulrike Mosse (neé Wolff). He attended the grammar school in Lissa (then Germany, now Leszno, Poland), but for economic reasons he did not finish. At the age of fifteen he became a bookstore apprentice in Posen (then Prussia, Germany; now Poznan, Poland). After a short period in Berlin, where he stayed with his oldest brother Salomon, he started working for the publisher of the magazine Gartenlaube, Robert Apitsch, in Leipzig, Saxony. There he came up with idea of soliciting advertisements and established a dedicated advertising supplement to the publication. His idea proved to be a commercial success.

On January 1, 1867 Rudolf Mosse opened his own newspaper advertising agency (Zeitungs-Annoncen Expedition) in Berlin. Soon he opened several independent branches in Germany, i.e. Munich (München), Stuttgart, and Hamburg, but also abroad Basel, Zürich, Vienna, and Prague. By 1917 the company had 18 independent branches and 280 agencies both in Germany and abroad.

In 1873, Rudolf Mosse married the daughter of a businessman, Benjamin Loewenstein, Emilie, in Trier. Soon thereafter they adopted Felicia (neé Marx).

Despite the economic success of his advertisement business, of broader notoriety is Rudolf Mosse's connection to the leading liberal daily the Berliner Tageblatt that he founded in 1871. It was originally founded as a commercial periodical, but under the leadership of the editor-in-chief Arthur Levysohn, who joined the Berliner Tageblatt in 1881, the political news section was organized, and the paper took on a liberal character. Arthur Levysohn retired in 1906. He was succeeded by Rudolf Mosse's cousin and correspondent of the Berliner Tageblatt from Paris, Theodor Wolff. Under his influence the paper became the stalwart of the left liberalism in Germany.

Besides the Berliner Tageblatt Rudolf Mosse acquired several other newspapers in Berlin, Germany, i.e Berliner Morgen-Zeitung , and Berliner Volks-Zeitung. Rudolf Mosse also controlled several publications abroad, among others Zürcher Post (Zürich, Switzerland), Deutsche Warschauer Zeitung (Warsaw, Poland), or Balkanska Poshta (Sofia, Bulgaria). In addition to daily newspapers, Rudolf Mosse's company published circa 130 professional and trade periodicals. It also had a book publishing division and its own printing house.

The charitable and art-patronage activities of Rudolf Mosse also deserve mentioning. Together with his wife Emilie Mosse he founded a home for children of impoverished families, the "Emilie- und Rudolf Mosse-Stiftung" in Wilmersdorf (Germany). He opened a hospital in Grätz and established an insurance fund for his employees. His gifts to various educational and public institutions were recognized with an honorary degree from the University of Heidelberg. Rudolf Mosse also served on the board of the Berlin Jewish Reform Community.

With the changed social and economic situation in Germany after the First World War, Rudolf Mosse withdrew from public life and died on September 8, 1920 in Schenkendorf, Germany.

Lachmann-Mosse, Hans

Hans Lachmann-Mosse was born on August 9, 1885 in Berlin to industrialist Georg Lachmann and Hedwig (neé Eltzbacher). He studied law in Freiburg im Breisgau and Berlin. In 1909 he married the only (adoptive) daughter of the press magnate Rudolf Mosse; later their last names were united. He served in the German army throughout the First World War.

He worked for the Rudolf Mosse publishing house beginning in 1910, developing and administrating the social and charitable activities of the Rudolf Mosse company. After the death of his father-in-law in 1920 he took over managerial responsibilities as well as partial ownership of the concern. He tried to expand the business, but his investments were not always met with the approval of others in the top management, including the editor-in-chief of the Berliner Tageblatt, Theodor Wolff. The economic difficulties in which the Rudolf Mosse company found itself at the end of the 1920s were made even worse by the depression in Germany at the beginning of the 1930s. In 1933 the NSDAP seized control over its business in Germany.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse left Germany for France in 1933. He divorced in 1939 and soon after married Karola Strauch on March 23, 1939. Later, they emigrated to the United States and settled in California.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse sat on the Board of the Reform Jewish community in Berlin and presided over its liturgy commission. Some of the restitution material in this collection relates to the reform Jewish liturgy. He also was an art collector and benefactor. In 1923 he commissioned Erich Mendelsohn to renovate of the Rudolf Mosse edifice in Berlin.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse died on April 18, 1944 in Oakland, California.

Lachmann-Mosse, Hilde

Hilde Lachmann-Mosse was born in Berlin as the daughter of Hans and Felicia Lachmann-Mosse on January 28, 1912. She attended the Staatliche August-Schule in Berlin between 1919-1931. Thereafter she studied medicine, first at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg im Breisgau, later in Bonn. After the NSDAP take-over in Germany she continued her studies at the University of Basel (Basler Universität), Switzerland, where she received her medical degree in 1938.

During her studies in Berlin she participated in the Jugendgemeinschaft der Jüdischen Reformgemeinde (Youth Association of the Berlin Reform Jewish Community) that was traditionally supported by her family. Hilde Lachmann-Mosse was always interested in social issues. When she studied in Basel, she participated in relief efforts on behalf of the German emigrés, particularly physicians. In 1938, she left Switzerland for the United States.

Hilde Lachmann Mosse's original specialization was pediatrics, but soon she became interested in child-psychology and psychiatry. Together with Fredric Wertham she founded the Lafargue Clinic in Harlem, New York, which was the first free mental health clinic on the eastern coast of the United States. Another of her research interests was reading disorders. She was also captivated by the relationship of violence and mass media.

Later, Hilde Lachmann-Mosse became a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the New York Medical College. She lectured as Fulbright Professor for Child Psychiatry at the University of Marburg, Germany in 1964-1965.

Her book The complete handbook of children's reading disorders was published posthumously.

Hilde Lachmann-Mosse died on January 15, 1982 in New York.

Extent

8 Linear Feet

Abstract

The Mosse Family Collection documents the social and economic upward mobility of the Jewish family in Germany. Personal papers of Marcus Mosse, a physician in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland), his sons Alfred Mosse, a lawyer, and Rudolf Mosse, a publisher and owner of the Berliner Tageblatt, Hans Lachmann-Mosse and his wife Felicia Mosse, and their daughter Hilde Lachmann-Mosse, a pediatrician and child psychiatrist, comprise the core of the collection. Other members of the family are also represented. The collection also contains records of the advertising agency Annoncen-Expedition Rudolf Mosse, mostly originating from its Zürich office in Switzerland. These records show the efforts of preservation of some of the family and company assets in secure places after the NSDAP take-over in Germany in 1933. The collection consists mainly of correspondence, personal items, newspaper clippings, photographs, and audio tapes.

Provenance

The papers of the Mosse family were gathered by the LBI staff for more than three decades. During this time the collection was used several times for research and several partial inventories were created. The material was donated by various members of this extensive family.

Large portions of the aforementioned papers were donated by George L. Mosse and his partner John Tortorice. Most of the material related to Hans and Lachmann-Mosse as well as Hilde L. Mosse came to the LBI Archives after Hilde L. Mosse's death in 1982.

Käthe Olschki (neé Mosse) and Martha Mosse gave material on Marcus Mosse and Albert Mosse.

The material on the "Emilie-Rudolf Mosse-Stiftung" was donated by Dagobert Broh (Montreal, Canada) in 1985.

The correspondence of Martha Mosse to her sister Dora Panofsky (neé Mosse) and three photos of Martha Mosse were donated by Hans Panofsky, the son of Dora Panofsky, in 1988.

Some material on Albert Mosse was donated by Walther Mosse.

The affidavits and letters of support for Martha Mosse were donated by Hans G. Raisner in 1968. The copies of Martha Mosse's reports on the Berlin Jewish community 1934-1943 and life in the concentration camp Terezín/Theresienstadt were given to the LBI Archives by Edward van Voolen in 2001.

Ryuichi Nagao donated a review of his book in 1998.

Microfilm

The collection is on fifteen reels of microfilm (MF 648):

  1. Reel 1: 1/1 - 1/17
  2. Reel 2: 1/18 - 1/37
  3. Reel 3: 1/38 - 2/30
  4. Reel 4: 2/31 - 3/31
  5. Reel 5: 3/32 - 3/66
  6. Reel 6: 3/67 - 4/8
  7. Reel 7: 4/9 - 4/30
  8. Reel 8: 4/31 - 5/18
  9. Reel 9: 5/19 - 5/42
  10. Reel 10: 5/43 - 6/9
  11. Reel 11: 6/10 - 6/25
  12. Reel 12: 6/26 - 7/9
  13. Reel 13: 7/10 - 7/32
  14. Reel 14: 7/33 - 8/16
  15. Reel 15: 8/17 - 8/34

Other finding aids

There are several inventory lists and an item level description of the content of the bound documents and papers of Marcus Mosse.

Related Material

The George L. Mosse Collection at the Leo Baeck Archives (AR 25137).

The New York Public Library maintains the Lafargue Clinic Records collection, the clinic in Harlem that Hilde Lachmann-Mosse helped to found.

Separated Material

Books were removed to the LBI library, including the gift of a publication mapping the publishing industry in pre-war Germany to Rudolf Mosse on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his firm. The books are available on microfiche (MF 116).

All photographs were removed from the collection and are part of to the Photograph Collection at the LBI Archives.

The diaries of Hilde Mosse are now part of the Memoir Collection LBI (ME 1211).

The correspondence of Albert Mosse was removed from the collection in 2000, but was reintegrated during re-processing in 2004.

General

Old call numbers AR 99, AR 3375, AR 3376, AR 3377, AR 203, AR 306, AR 3535, AR 3271, MF 331, MF 332, MF 116

Processing Information

In 2004 the collection was reprocessed and a new finding aid was written. The collection of Alfred Mosse was reintegrated to the Mosse family collection. The personal documents and correspondence of Marcus Mosse were bound in a volume. This binding was taken apart and individual letters sorted by the addressees. Documents were filed into topical folders. All photographs and images were removed from the collection to the Photograph Collection at the Leo Baeck Institute Archives and substituted with photocopies. Similarly, several over-sized items were moved to an over-sized box, OS 39, and substituted with photocopies.

Title
Guide to the Papers of the Mosse Family, 1676-2001 (bulk 1828-1982) AR 25184 / MF 648
Status
Completed
Author
Processed by Stanislav Pejša
Date
© 2004
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
Description is in English.
Edition statement
This version was derived from MosseFamily.xml

Revision Statements

  • January 2006.: Entities removed from EAD finding aid.
  • January 2008.: Reference to NYPL collection added to Related Material.
  • July 2008.: Biographical Note edited.
  • September 2008.: Microfilm inventory added.
  • February 07, 2012 : Links to digital objects added in Container List.

Repository Details

Part of the Leo Baeck Institute Repository

Contact:
15 West 16th Street
New York NY 10011 United States