Skip to main content

Leo Herrmann Collection

 Collection
Identifier: AR 11640

Scope and Content Note

The collection contains letters and postcards to Leo Herrmann, his wife Lola Herrmann, and daughter Ruth Herrmann from various senders, including Max Brod, Franz Werfel, George Bernard Shaw, Martin Buber, and Albert Einstein.

Dates

  • undated, 1909-1950

Creator

Language of Materials

This collection is in German and English.

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Access Information

Collection is digitized. Follow the links in the Container List to access the digitized materials.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact:

Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011

email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

Biographical Note

Leo Herrmann was a journalist and Zionist activist, born 1888 in Landskron. After studying law in Prague, Herrmann joined the Bar Kochba Association, the organization of Prague Zionists, in 1906 and served as its chairman between 1908 and 1909. Herrmann was editor of the Prague Zionist weekly Selbstwehr (Self-Defense) from 1910 to 1913. Under his editorship, it became a respected political and literary journal. In 1913, Herrmann moved to Berlin, where he assumed the post of secretary of the World Zionist Organization and later became editor-in-chief of Die jüdische Rundschau (The Jewish Review), succeeding his cousin Hugo Herrmann. He published Nathan Birnbaum, sein Werk und seine Wandlung (Nathan Birnbaum: His Work and His Transformation) in 1914 and the pamphlet “Im Kampf um die hebräische Sprache” (The Struggle for the Hebrew Language) in the same year. Die Treue (Fidelity), a collection of essays on Jewish themes, appeared in 1916. Herrmann was one of the promoters of Martin Buber’s journal Der Jude, which was launched in 1916. He was a member of the Czechoslovak delegation at the Versailles Peace Conference. In 1920, he cofounded Keren Hayesod (the Palestine Foundation Fund) with Berthold Feiwel. In 1926, Hermann moved to Jerusalem, where he worked as general secretary of Keren Hayesod. He remained in that position until his death in 1951.

Extent

4 Folders

Abstract

The collection contains letters and postcards to Leo Herrmann, his wife Lola Herrmann, and daughter Ruth Herrmann from various senders, including Max Brod, Franz Werfel, George Bernard Shaw, Martin Buber, and Albert Einstein.

Title
Guide to the Leo Herrmann Collection, undated, 1909-1950  AR 11640
Status
In Progress
Author
Processed by Sarah Glover
Date
© 2013
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Revision Statements

  • July 2015:: dao links added by Emily Andresini.

Repository Details

Part of the Leo Baeck Institute Repository

Contact:
15 West 16th Street
New York NY 10011 United States