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Shloyme Rosenberg Collection

 Collection
Identifier: P-712

Scope and Content Note

The Shloyme Rosenberg Collection contains manuscripts and newspaper columns written by Rosenberg. Also included are some personal materials such as correspondence, certificates, and international documentation. Newspaper columns comprise the majority of the collection and are written under a variety of pseudonyms, including S.R. Berg, A. Prashker, I. Prashker, S. Prashker, Reb Shloyme, and Shrage. The manuscript and newspaper and journal publications series are divided into works written under Shloyme Rosenberg's own name and works written under any of his pseudonyms. A majority of the material is written in Yiddish, with some manuscripts translated into English and some articles in Hebrew. Yiddish titles have been transliterated and are arranged according to transliterated title. The collection is arranged in three series: Series I: Manuscripts; Series II: Newspaper and Journal Publications; and Series III: Subject Files.

Dates

  • undated, 1940-1977

Creator

Language of Materials

The collection is predominantly in Yiddish, with some English, French, and Hebrew.

Access Restrictions

The collection is open to all researchers, except items that may be restricted due to their fragility, or privacy.

Use Restrictions

No permission is required to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection, as long as the usage is scholarly, educational, and non-commercial. For inquiries about other usage, please contact the Director of Collections and Engagement at mmeyers@ajhs.org.

For reference questions, please email: inquiries@cjh.org

Biographical Note

Shloyme Rosenberg, son of Henoch and Nehama Rosenberg, was born in Laskarzew, Poland on April 23, 1896. As a boy in Poland, he studied at the gymnasium Staszic in Lublin. At the age of 22, in February of 1918, Rosenberg published his first poem entitled "The Death of the Priest Eli." After this publication, as Rosenberg writes, "so I became a writer!" In 1919, he traveled to Palestine and worked in the orange groves and vineyards. The cousin of famed Yiddish theater actor Maurice Schwartz, Rosenberg also acted on the Hebrew stage in Israel.

In 1922, upon his return to Poland, he became a printer. All the while, he still wrote poems and began translating works into Yiddish from Russian, French, and Polish. As he describes it, "I read by a chance the great work of the renowned Polish writer Stanislaw Wladislaw Reymont, his 4 volume 'CHLOPI'... and I was very impressed by it." The work inspired Rosenberg to translate it into Yiddish. This was no small feat considering the book inspired Rosenberg to translate it into Yiddish. This was no small feat considering the book was approximately 2,000 pages. The endeavor took him two years, 1924 to 1926, to accomplish. Apparently, Reymont knew about the translation and was "delighted" when it was done.

Around this time, Rosenberg began writing for the Haynt, a large Yiddish daily newspaper in Warsaw, Poland. Sholem Asch, who at the time was also a contributor to the Haynt from Nice, France, read Rosenberg's translation of Chlopi and requested that he become Asch's literary secretary. Rosenberg accepted and went to live in Nice. While in Nice, Rosenberg begam to write novels and published them in serial form in the Haynt. His position with Sholem Asch lasted from 1930 to 1938.

On February 28, 1936, Rosenberg married Regina Prashker. In 1937, while still in Nice, their son Marc Israel was born. According to Marc, while there, Rosenberg wrote articles, condemning Hitler. Apparently someone informed Rosenberg that he was on a hit list due to these articles and when war broke out, Rosenberg, along with his wife and son, escaped to Morocco. In 1941, after a year in Morocco, the Rosenbergs found their way to the United States. Within three months, Shloyme became a staff member for the Jewish Day, a Yiddish newspaper. Already fluent in German, French, Polish, Hebrew, Spanish, and Russian, he taught himself English and spent a lot of time at the Columbia University Library. Rosenberg stayed at the Jewish Day until the last years of his life. During this time, Shloyme and Regina had another son, Harold Reuben and then adopted a daughter, Rene Frayman.

While writing for the Jewish Day, Rosenberg published many serial novels along with thousands of articles, essays, and reviews. Many of these were published under various pseudonyms such as S.R. Berg, A. Prashker, I. Prashker, S. Prashker, Reb Shloyme, and Shrage. Some of the pseudonyms are clear. S.R. Berg clearly stands for "Shloyme Rosen Berg;" Prashker is his wife's maiden name. Shrage, however, is somewhat of a mystery. Rosenberg's publications include Tsvishn Feyer un Shwert, 1942; Der Idisher Monakh, 1943; Idishe Heldn, 1943; Rabbi Akiba, 1944; Shlomo Hamelech, 1944; In Kamf far a Neyer Velt, 1945; Der Idisher Prinz, 1947; Bar Kochba, 1948; Rabbi Meir and Beruriah, 1950; Moshiach's Tsayin, 1950; Der Idisher Kenig bei der Volga, 1954; Sholem Asch Fun Der Noent, 1958; Di Kuzrim, 1960; and Shabbetzay Zevi, 1965. He was a member of the Yiddish PEN Club, the Yiddish Writers Union, LZOA-Poale Zion, and Farband Labor Zionist Order. He also wrote for the Yiddish theater in New York City. Shloyme Rosenberg died in New York in 1975 at the age of seventy-nine.

Extent

11.15 Linear Feet (12 manuscript boxes, 2 20"x16"x3" boxes, 1 24"x20"x3" box)

Abstract

The Shloyme Rosenberg Collection contains manuscripts and newspaper columns written by Rosenberg. Also included are some personal materials such as correspondence, certificates, and international documentation. Newspaper columns comprise the majority of the collection and are written under a variety of pseudonyms, including S.R. Berg, A. Prashker, I. Prashker, S. Prashker, Reb Shloyme, and Shrage. The manuscript and newspaper and journal publications series are divided into works written under Shloyme Rosenberg's own name and works written under any of his pseudonyms. A majority of the material is written in Yiddish, with some manuscripts translated into English and some articles in Hebrew. Yiddish titles have been transliterated and are arranged according to transliterated title.

Arrangement

The collection has been arranged into three series and oversized separate material listing as follows:

  1. Series I: Manuscripts, undated, 1940-1953
  2. Subseries A: S. Rosenberg, undated, 1940-1942, 1951, 1953
  3. Subseries B: Pseudonyms, undated
  4. Series II: Newspaper and Journal Publications, undated, 1940-1977
  5. Subseries A: Shloyme Rosenberg, undated, 1940-1977
  6. Subseries B: Pseudonyms, undated, 1944, 1955-1956, 1958-1959, 1961, 1964, 1967-1968
  7. Series III: Subject Files, undated, 1940-1977
  8. Separated Oversized Material

Provenance

The Society acquired the collection from Marc Rosenberg in 1987.

Title
Guide to the Papers of Shloyme Rosenberg Collection (1896-1975), undated, 1940-1977   P-712
Status
Completed
Author
Processed by Abby Lester (December 1999), Marvin Rusinek (September-October 2006)
Date
© 2006
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
Description is in English.

Revision Statements

  • November 2020: EHyman: post-ASpace migration cleanup.

Repository Details

Part of the American Jewish Historical Society Repository

Contact:
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New York NY 10011 United States